Covid-19 research trial


 

General Practice Research

The Hadleigh Practice is now “research active”: helping to conduct high-quality clinical research with the National Institute for Health Research to improve NHS care. Participation in a clinical research study is entirely voluntary but can be a rewarding experience.

National Institute for Health Research

Set up in 2006 by the Department of Health, The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) aims to improve the health and wealth of the nation using Research. To find out more about the work of the NIHR Clinical Research Network go to www.crn.nihr.ac.uk

What are the Benefits of taking part in research?

  • Potential access to new treatments and medicines
  • Ultimately, improved cost-effective access to healthcare for patient
  • Increased range for skills for staff involved in research including standardised training: Clinical Research is Good Clinical Practice for Research (GCP) training is a requirement for anyone involved in research. GCP is an international standard to which all NHS research is conducted.  GCP Trained Staff: Dr Callum Harmer.

Current Research Studies

The PRINCIPLE trial:

Part of the UK Government’s rapid research response to the coronavirus pandemic, is testing medications that could prevent the need for hospitalisation in people over 50 years old with COVID-19.

Patient involvement:

Do you want to be involved in this research and have you tested positive for Coronavirus disease (Covid-19) in the last few days? If you are over 65, or over 50 and would normally be eligible for the flu jab, you might be eligible to enter a research study into possible treatments for Covid-19.

If you would like to find out more, please follow the link:

https://www.principletrial.org/participants/participant-information-sheets

As the research study is arranged through and carried out by the National Institute for Health Research, the surgery staff have no details of the study, so please do not call the Hadleigh Practice with queries about this study.



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